Skip to main content

What to do at Your Office Breaking Point?

What to do at Your Office Breaking Point?

By Hayley Shaughnessy

 

So, you’ve established a loving relationship with your company, but not so much with the workload. Your company stands for all that you look for in an employer, but the time, stress and energy demands are pushing you towards the exit sign.

You’ve found yourself at your breaking point and are willing to sacrifice just about anything – a pay cut or location change – for a calmer pace or a more manageable workload. What do you do?

For starters, rest assured that you’re not alone in feeling this way. A recent poll from Monster Canada found that one-in-four Canadians have left a job due to stress. Not to mention that six-in-ten working Canadians state they’re overworked.

If you’ve found yourself at a crossroads at work, but don’t want to give up just yet, here are some tips and advice to keep moving forward.
 

Say it out loud!

It’s likely you’re talking about your stress and workload with your close friends and family outside of the office, but have you done so with your manager? Make sure you check off the due diligence box and speak with your manager about how you’re handling the workload and if you’re feeling particularly stressed at work.

Remember to keep it professional, and try to think of ways he or she can help you before the meeting begins. It can help to go into this meeting with some speaking points, such as tangible examples of projects or assignments that might be causing you to feel strained at work.

Having ongoing conversations with your manager about your workload will help the both of you find a better balance to take on less and more in the future. So use the opportunity to speak up and come up with a solution. If you’re a part of a large team, there’s likely opportunity for your work to be distributed among your colleagues, but that might not happen if you don’t voice your concern.

 

Hop to it

After speaking with your manager, you may learn of new opportunities and choices within your company to help you find a better balance. If you love your company and don’t want to leave, a change of scenery within your current walls might be the adjustment you need.

If it intrigues you, ask to meet with different employees from other teams to see if there’s a fit for you.

Keep an open mind and take the necessary time to research any other opportunities that arise.

 

Refuel and reengage

If your office has work/life balance programs, be sure to enroll or test out one or two before making the final call on your job. Since you’ve found yourself head over heels for your company, you may find that you enjoy the added perks and opportunities to grow outside of the office.  

Participating in wellness activities that can benefit the way you work in the office and at home will offer fresh perspectives and tools for you to succeed in finding that balance. Check in with your colleagues to see what they have learned from wellness programs to see if it would be a good fit for you, too.

Interestingly enough, the Monster Canada poll also found that nearly two-thirds of working Canadians agree that their employer supports work-life balance.


Keep building your network

Outside of the office, you can focus on maintaining your professional relationships by attending more networking events. Although work may be the thing stressing you out most, chatting with people in your industry can be refreshing and helpful in your own journey to find more balance and enjoyment.

 

Find your better

As the Coldplay lyrics goes, “when you try your best and you don’t succeed,” or you find yourself back at your breaking point once more, it may be time for a clean break. Know that there are ways to find better at work. Having experienced a range of stress levels and handling different workloads will help you better prepare for what you want in the future.

 

For more tips on career life balance, workplace issues or hoping to find better, visit career-advice.monster.ca.


Take The Monster Poll!

Back to top